Thor #6 – Comics Review

The mystery of “who is the new Thor?” unfolds while closing in on a suspect. Thor #6 offers:

  • Strong choice of colour and details.
  • Strong character connection scenes.
  • Themes of the environment, and identity.

This issue contains minor spoilers for Thor #6

Colour throughout the comic builds up a specific tone for each scene. Background details in the comic show off key points of identity for Roz Soloman and Dario Agger.

While early scenes in the comic deal with Dario Agger’s past, a scene on Asgardia shows off the miraculous colours of the Bifrost bridge, and gold clockwork that drive Asgard’s connection between worlds.

Colour effectively lays out the main emotional moments of the comic. Dario Agger’s past is painted with black and blood red. Thor takes down a horde of trolls under fiery orange light. Thor, hammerless, laments his loss of worthiness, and sombre blue light floods the page. Jane Foster rests in the Asgardian Hall of Medicine, which is surrounded by Sakura pink trees. Their colour and falling petals set a romantic tone when hammerless Thor visits Jane during her rest.

Background details in the art are also effective. Dario Agger and Ros Solomon both have forms of identification turn up as background art. Ros’ SHEILD identity card appears in one scene. Agger is surrounded by framed, poster sized copies of his appearances on the covers of Forbes, the New York Bulletin, Fortune, and Time. Agger has a tiger skin thrown casually over an expensive couch in his office. His ego, and disdain for the environment laid down in past Thor comics continues in Thor #6

Several key connections between characters are made here, which speeds their development: Dario Agger and Malekith, Thor and Jane Foster. Thor meets with a popular SHIELD agent on his search for the new Thor.

Malekith of Svartalheim discusses a business deal with Dario Agger. Heimdall hints at the significants of this connection. He
observes many meetings and events that he passes on to the hammerless Thor. But hammerless Thor is far more interested in identifying the name and face of the new Thor.

The woman wielding mjolnir is mostly absent from this comic. With the help of a popular SHIELD agent, Thor crosses names off his list – yes, he has made a list of women he thinks are the new Thor – and moves toward the last name of that list.

Thor’s handwriting is excellent, which belies the savage fighting style he has adopted when wielding his axe, Jarnbjorn. without the hammer, Thor’s loss of identity grows further in this issue. Jane Foster comments on his taking of the name “Odinson”. She says “you’re so much more than just your father’s child.”

While the environment themes continue here, identity emerged as a large theme – connections and ties with others builds identity rather than only names, property, or physical attributes.

The large scale environment theme still continues, linking this comic together with recent Thor comics. Dario Agger is not interested in the wildlife found on Malekith’s world. He only wants to know if elves ever drill for oil.

Identity is a larger, new theme that is brought out in this comic. Property, physical appearance, talents, and names are all mentioned or appear while Thor searches for the identity of the new Thor. The comic collects together all the items that a person might use to define their identity.

A value emerges close to the end of the comic. Apart from names, property, and appearance, connections with others that define identity. What catalyses and mobilises a person’s identity, or even god’s in this case, is connections. Thor’s identity is clarified when he meets with Jane. Malekith and Dario Agger

A QR code that appears on Jane Foster’s SHEILD identification card is a link to her marvel.wikia.com page

Thor #6 is published by Marvel Comics ($3.99 USD) Jason Aaron (W.) Russel Dauterman (A.) Matthew Wilson (C.) VC’s Joe Sabino (L. & P.) Cover artwork by Dauterman and Wilson.

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